Vibrant Events - Celebrating from the heart
weddings  /   services  /   get started  /   about corina  /   testimonials  /   press  /   contact us
19
Nov
by Corina

Starbucks cup without a straw

Image Source: https://cdn-starbucks.netdna-ssl.com

Starbucks is well known around the world for their delightful drinks, and whatever they do, they are sure to capture public attention. Once again, the company shocked the world when they announced their plans to entirely get rid of plastic straws by the year 2020 to help limit their environmental impact. With this announcement and move to strawless lids, the coffee franchise has succeeded in bringing public attention back towards issues of environmentalism.

Following in their footsteps, many other industries and individuals are making their own “No More Staws” resolutions or take other actions (such as moving to eco-friendly packaging) to raise awareness about issues of environmentalism and limit their own impact. In fact, choosing to shop or receive services from these types eco-friendly organizations is another way you can go green! Here is why you too should take up the gauntlet and challenge yourself to get rid of plastic straws in your life.

What’s All the Fuss About?

Each year, the plastic industry continues to grow at an alarming rate, much faster than it is able to be recycled and broken down. According to a report published in Science Advances, around 80% of plastic waste ends up in landfills, 12% is burned, and only 9% is actually recycled. This means that there is a high percentage of waste that is continuously building up within our landfills. In addition, the chemicals that are added to plastics means these items cannot entirely be recycled.

The Gateway to Plastic Elimination

Eliminating plastic straws may seem futile in the face of all the tons of plastic accumulating each year, but many believe that because straws are something consumers experience daily around the globe, they can be used as a conversation starter about our current global plastic problem. Straws, like many other plastic products, are designed for one-time-use before being discarded. And it has become too easy to get into the habit of using these without thinking about their impact to our environment. So, for the sake of creating a healthier habit of eliminating waste, sometimes it is necessary to start small–maybe even with something as simple as a straw.

How to Start

Cocktails

Image Source: https://unsplash.com/photos/eXdKs9d37Sc

1) “No Straw Please”: Be sure to let your bartender or server know you don’t need a straw. Eliminating from the source- you- is the best place to start.
2) Consider alternatives: There are many different companies offering alternatives to straws that can help to eliminate the plastic waste. For example, using metal straws that can be reused, or adorable paper straws that are biodegradable in municipal or home compost.
3) Pasta to the rescue: A new company that’s become part of the solution, has created pasta straws to replace plastic. Genius! Additionally, linguine pasta is a great replacement for plastic coffee stirs. Two more reason to love Pasta!

We love this new #plasticsucks movement, because it’s bringing to life that giving back to OUR environment doesn’t have to be limited to sorting your garbage at home. If you are thinking about the ways that you can alter your own daily habits at Starbucks, your local bar, or away on vacation, to become more environmentally conscious then you are on your way to making lasting change. Just don’t forget to tell your friends to join you in this movement. We will have a greater impact #together!

* * * * * * * *

Author Bio: Katie McDaniel is a writer and editor with a passion for conservation and environmentalism. She covers everything from the latest developments in HR to business communication, and enjoys writing about traveling and events.

26
Apr
by Corina

This month TIME Magazine features 51 Things We Can Do in response to global warming. Along with switching to energy-efficient light bulbs, turning fuel into food, and capturing CO2 with clean coal plant solutions, I was surprised to see that the greening of weddings made the list!

#28. Have a green wedding
By Catherine Sharick

You won’t be able to stop global warming on your wedding day, but your choices can lessen the carbon footprint of your event. For example, if your guests are traveling long distances, offset the carbon emissions from their trips with a donation to renewable—energy projects. The sustainable wedding website Portovert.com, in partnership with NativeEnergy, a renewable energy company, offers a wedding carbon calculator where couples can enter the number of guests and approximate miles traveled, to calculate the carbon impact of their wedding—related travel.

Wherever you celebrate, you can reduce your CO2 impact and often save money by giving your wedding a local touch. Buy wine from a nearby vineyard or beer from a neighborhood brewery. Get your wedding cake from a local bakery, and use seasonal flowers, not imports. “Why eat food or drink wine or beer that has traveled thousands of miles when you can choose local options that are just as good?” says Meghan Meyers, CEO of portovert.com.

The wedding industry is a $139 billion a year in the US, spent on rings, venues, engagement parties, the ceremony and reception, gowns, rentals, the honeymoon, etc. These events, though seemingly short in time, are full of environmental impact. Using local and organic caterers, sourcing organic wine, and offsetting your carbon emissions from nonprofit organizations like DriveNeutral can make your event a responsible celebration which supports our environment for generations to come.

Consider going green your wedding gift to the planet!

16
Feb
by Corina

What are some of the easiest/simplest ways to green a wedding or event if you have very little time or resources to devote to it?

If you don’t have a lot of money or a lot of time, here are five quick and easy steps you can take to green your special event. Personally I always start with the 3R’s:

1. Reduce the amount of stuff you purchase. Remember the golden rule of design: less is more. Don’t over purchase food or supplies for the party. This just adds to the waste—of natural resources and hard earned cash.

2. Reuse, or borrow where you can. I’ve planned a lot of weddings that incorporated antique tea cup collections, platters and plates, or a variety of flower vases and candlesticks all borrowed from family members happy to help. This not only adds a lovely chic look, but it also brings a warm and touching representation of family into the occasion.

3. Recycle whatever you can. In some cities recycling everything may be difficult, so just do your best. Set out separate containers to capture glass bottles, plastic, aluminum cans and after the event be sure to recycle the aluminum containers your caterer may have brought the food in this is often overlooked, and an important part of having a zero waste event! Remember, it takes 90% less energy to recycle an aluminum can than to make a new one.

4. Donate leftovers. This includes food, unopened drinks, decorations like live plants or flowers. These items will be happily accepted by nursing homes or shelters for the homeless. Check your local listings for organizations to support.

5. Consider offsetting the emissions of your event by having guests pay a suggested amount. At one event I produced, the hosts had a small, very attractive sign at the sign-in table which explained carbon offsets and their desire to make the event carbon neutral. They suggested a dollar amount each guest leave inside a designated box. For some this may seem too forward, but in this case it was successful because of the nature of the event and the creative way it was presented. I think you might be surprised to find that guests are thrilled to participate in such a unique suggestion that helps a great cause stopping global warming.

 

advice and inspiration!
sign up to receive our newsletter
Email icon - Sign up to receive our newsletter 
Facebook  Twitter  Pinterest logo  Instagram logo  Tumblr logo 

Certified by The Guide
Twitter Logo vibrant tweets
Instagram Logo instagram feed